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Origin: London, England

Genre: Anarcho punk

Years active: 1981–1984

Members:
Kay Byatt
Mark
Wayne Preston
Punky Pete
Olga
Eddie
Lou
Mick Clarke
Bernie

Discography:
Sex Object tracklist
C.B.S. (Cash Before Sincerity)
Paper Love
Power And The Glory
They Shoot Children Don’t They?
Blind Reality
Victim of Rape
How They Live
Armygigolo Time
Happy Families
Sunday Bloody Sunday
Lady Madonna

Biography:

Youth in Asia were an early 1980s UK anarcho punk band from London, whose name was word play of the word euthanasia.[1] They were differentiated from many other bands within that scene by their prominent use of the synthesizer. The band’s first live performance was in Brussels in December 1981.[1] They played several gigs at squatted venues, including Crass’s squat gig at Zig Zag in London,[2] and the Wapping Autonomy Centre with other bands including The Apostles, Crass, Flux of Pink Indians, Twelve Cubic Feet, The Mob, Poison Girls, Hagar the Womb, Riot/Clone, DIRT and others.

The band sang ‘political’ lyrics about issues such as war, sexism and state terrorism.

The initial line-up was Kay Byatt (vocals), Mark (guitar), Wayne Preston (bass guitar), Punky Pete (drums), and Olga (vocals/keyboards).[1] Pete was soon replaced by Eddie on drums, and Lou, formerly of The Witches joined on rhythm guitar.[1] In 1983, Eddie and Lou both left the band with Mick Clarke and Bernie, both previously of Windsor’s Disease, replacing them.[3] The new line-up recorded a single for Crass Records, but the band split up before it was released, with some of the members forming a new band, Decadent Few.[4]

Byatt later sang with Radical Dance Faction and The Astronauts.[4]

They released one cassette album entitled Sex Object on Millennium tapes (1983). They also had their song “Power And The Glory” included on Volume II of the Crass Records Bullshit Detector compilation series.[5] “When the Wind Blows”, from the band’s final recording session, was included on the Overground compilation Anti-War, Anarcho-Punk Compilation Volume One”.[4]